(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "University of North Carolina Summer Courses in Theology"

JK- 



Universitv of North Carolina. 



SUMMER COURSES 



GEOLOGY. 



JUNE-- JULY 1897. 




CHAPEL HILL, N. C: 
1897. 



SUMMER COURSES IN GEOLOGY, 1897. 



I. 

A course in general physical and structural geology, including 
mineralogy, will be given at Chapel Hill. N. C. It will begin on 
Tuesday, June 22d. and close on 'Friday, July Kith. Lectures will 
be given daily. The mornings will be occupied with work in the 
laboratory on the physical properties of minerals, varieties of rock 
and rock- structures : ,and free use will be made of models, maps, 
diagrams, and photographs. The afternoons will be spent in field 
work in the intermediate neighborhood, and occasionally an entire 
day, after the morning lecture, will be given to such work. The 
course is accepted as college work, counting as the equivalent of 
the first course in geology during the fall term. It is open to all 
students who have had the course in physiography, or its equiva- 
lent. The course will afford practical preparation for field work, 
and be of especial value to teachers. 

Students should provide themselves with hammer, pocket com- 
pass, note-book, and satchel or bag for carrying any specimens 
which may be collected!' No text-book is prescribed, but students 
having the larger text-books of Dana, Geikie, or Le ( 'onte. are 
advised to bring them for use as reference books. Other books of 
reference will be provided for the student's use in the laboratory. 
Application for admission to the -course should be made to Pro- 
fessor' Colliei" Cobb. .Chapel Hill.N.C. The fee will be $(i and 
should be paid to W. T. Patterson, Bursar. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

II. 
An advanced course in field geology for students who have 
already completed an elementary. course will begin June 9th, and 
last four weeks. The class will study the geologic structure of the 



Newark rocks and the character of the most typical ancient lavas, 
by a series of excursions from Chapel Hill, and on the road be- 
tweenChapel rlilland Sanford. There will be aperies of short ex- 
cursions from ( 'umnock and from Sanford to see. in addition. to the 
Newark, the structure exhibited in the unconsolidated deposits of 
the Lafayette and Columbia. The return to Chapel Hill will be 
by the eastern border of the Triassic. and the crystalline schists 
near Raleigh and older volcanics near Cary. 

Students who so desire may accompany the instructor to Southern 
Pines where an examination will be made of the unconsolidated 
deposits of the several coastal plain formations, the Potomac. 
Eocene, Lafayette and Columbia A few days later the party will 
go to Hamlet, where there are also a number of good exposures 
illustrating- the character, structure, and relations of the forma- 
tions along the western border of the coastal plain. 

Leaving Hamlet, the class will follow the Carolina Central 
Railroad as far west as Polkton, along which line there are a num- 
ber of good exposures, showing the character and relations be- 
tween the coastal plain formations and the Pee Dee River gran- 
ite ; and between the Triassic sandstone and this granite on the 
east and the slates on the west. This section of the Triassic sand- 
stone is especially instructive as showing faulting and the large 
number of dikes of varying width which have here broken through 
the sandstone. After reaching Polkton the class will break up 
for the season. The fee will be $10, and should be paid to W. T. 
Patterson. Bursal 1 . Chapel Hill, N. C. For further information 
address Professor (Jollier Cobb, Chapel Hill. N. C. 



SUMMER COURSES IN GEOLOGY, 1897. 






I. 

A course in general physical and structural geology, including 
mineralogy, will be given at Chapel Hill. N. C. It will begin on 
Tuesday. June 22d. and close on Friday. July Kith. Lectures will 
be given daily. The mornings will be occupied with work in the 
laboratory on the physical properties of minerals, varieties of rock 
and rock- structures : and free use will be made of models, maps, 
diagrams, and photographs. The afternoons will be spent in .field 
work in the intermediate neighborhood, and occasionally an entire 
day, after the morning lecture, will be given to such work. The 
course is accepted as college work, counting as the equivalent of 
the first course in geology during the fall term. It is open to all 
students who have had the course in physiography, or its equiva- 
lent. The course will afford practical preparation for field work, 
and be of especial value to teachers. 

Students should provide themselves with hammer, pocket com- 
pass, note-book, and satchel or bag for carrying any specimens 
which may be collected. No text-book is prescribed, but students 
having the larger text-books of Dana, Geikie, or Le Conte, arc 
advised to bring them for use as reference books. Other books of 
reference will be provided for the student's use in the laboratory. 
Application for admission to the course should be made to Pro- 
fessor- Colliei- Cobb, Chapel Hill.N.C. The fee will be $(> and 
should be paid to W. T. Patterson. Bursar. Chapel Hill. X. C. 

II. 
An advanced course in field geology for students who have 
already completed an elementary. course will begin June 9th, and 
last four weeks. The class will study the geologic structure of the 









Newark rooks and the character of the most typical ancient lavas. 
by a series of excursions from Chapel Hill, and on the road be- 
tween Chapel Hill and Sanford. There will be aperies of short ex- 
cursions from Cumnock and from Sanford to see. in addition.to the 
Newark, the structure exhibited in the unconsolidated deposits of 
the Lafayette and Columbia. The return to Chapel Hill will be 
by the eastern border of the Triassic. and the crystalline schists 
near Raleigh and older volcanics near Cary. 

Students who so desire may accompany the instructor to Southern 
Pines where an examination will lie made of the unconsolidated 
deposits of the several coastal plain formations, the Potomac, 
Eocene, Lafayette and Columbia A few days later the party will 
go to Hamlet, where there are also a number of good exposures 
illustrating the character, structure, and relations of the forma- 
tions along the western border of the coastal plain. 

Leaving Hamlet, the class will follow the Carolina Central 
Railroad as far west as Polkton. along which line there are a num- 
ber of good exposures, showing the character and relations be- 
tween the coastal plain formations and the Pee Dee River .gran- 
ite : and between the Triassic sandstone and this granite on the 
east and the slates on the west. This section of the Triassic sand- 
stone is especially instructive as showing faulting and the large 
number of dikes of varying width which have here broken through 
the sandstone. After reaching Polkton the class will break up 
for the season. The fee will be $10, and should be paid to W. T. 
Patterson. Bursar. Chapel Hill. N. C. For further information 
address Professor Collier Cobb, Chapel Hill, N. C.